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ARIEL Motorcycle Manuals PDF

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ARIEL-MOTORCYCLES-(1933-1950)-WIRING DIAGRAM
ARIEL-MOTORCYCLES-(1933-1950)-WIRING DIAGRAM
ARIEL-MOTORCYCLES-(1933-1950)-WIRING DIA
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ARIEL-350-SOLO-OHV-(MODEL-W-NG)-(1940)-DRIVER'S HANDBOOK
ARIEL-350-SOLO-OHV-(MODEL-W-NG)-(1940)-DRIVER'S HANDBOOK
ARIEL-350-SOLO-OHV-(MODEL-W-NG)-(1940)-D
Adobe Acrobat Document 10.9 MB

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History of Ariel Motorcycles

Some ARIEL Motorcycle Manuals PDF are above the page.

 

The history of the Ariel brand began in 1870.

 

In 1898, the first Ariel tricycle made its debut, in 1900 the ATV of the British company was first introduced, and already in 1902 Starley and Hillman made their first two-wheeled motorcycle, on which the Carry engine was installed.

 

Truly serious work began to boil almost immediately after that. By 1910, the company had already developed several revolutionary motorcycle models at that time, and after 1910 the production of engines of 150 and 500 cc began under the license of White and Poppy.

 

In 1914, the company introduced several interesting models to the public at once, among which the closest attention of motorists was attracted by the Arielette model, equipped with a 350-cc power unit of its own production.

 

In 1944, BSA became the owners of the Ariel brand. Three years later, serial production of the motorcycle model KH began, on which a 26-hp engine with a capacity of 499 cc was installed.

 

Soon, the new version of the cult Square Four motorcycle, which became much faster due to the reduction in engine weight by as much as 15 kilograms, made its debut.

 

In 1953, the bike received an even more modernized engine, the power of which amounted to 42 hp.

 

In the mid-1950s, Ariel motorcycle sales dropped significantly.

 

In the period from 1960 to 1962 the following models were released: the lightweight Arrow, the more powerful Sport Arrow (with an engine capacity of 20 hp), as well as the Pixie lacking the “body kit” with a 50 cc engine.

 

Unfortunately, none of these models allowed Ariel to reduce losses, and already in 1963 the company's plant was closed.